Xgeva (denosumab)

Medically Reviewed By Heather Bruce, PharmD

About Xgeva

Xgeva is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to:

Xgeva is approved for these uses in certain situations. For details about these conditions and how the drug is used, see the “Xgeva: Uses” section below.

* In this article, the term “adolescents” refers to children ages 12 to 16 years.

Key points

The following table provides key facts about Xgeva.

Active drug denosumab
Drug class RANKL inhibitor, which is a type of lab-made antibody
Form solution that’s given by subcutaneous injection

Finding a healthcare professional

If you’re interested in taking this drug, search here to find a doctor who might prescribe it.

Xgeva: Generic or biosimilar

Xgeva contains the active drug denosumab. It only comes as a brand-name medication. And it isn’t currently available as a generic or biosimilar drug.

A biosimilar medication is a drug that’s similar to a brand-name biologic drug (the parent drug). Xgeva is a biologic medication, which is also called a biologic. 

Biologic drugs are made from living cells. It’s not possible to copy these drugs exactly. A generic, on the other hand, is a drug made from chemicals. A generic is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. 

Biosimilars are considered to be just as safe and effective as their parent drug. As with generics, biosimilars tend to cost less than brand-name medications.

Xgeva: Side effects

As with most drugs, it’s possible to have side effects with Xgeva. These can include some mild side effects but also some serious ones.

To learn more about Xgeva’s side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They may also provide information about managing certain side effects of this drug.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Xgeva, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild and serious side effects

Mild and serious side effects of Xgeva are listed below. This article does not include all of Xgeva’s possible side effects.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Xgeva may include:

Most times, mild side effects of a drug go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if any side effects become severe or don’t go away.

* This is not a complete list of Xgeva’s mild side effects. To learn about other mild side effects of this drug, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Or you can view the drug’s prescribing information.
† To learn more about allergic reaction, see below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects of Xgeva may include:

  • jaw side effects, such as jaw pain caused by osteonecrosis (death of bone tissue) in the jaw
  • dental side effects, such as tooth infection or loose teeth, due to osteonecrosis in the jaw
  • unusual femur fractures (breaks of the thigh bone that happen with a minor injury or no obvious cause)
  • hypocalcemia (low calcium levels)
  • hypophosphatemia (low phosphate level)
  • hypercalcemia (high calcium levels) in certain people after stopping Xgeva
  • spinal fractures after stopping Xgeva
  • severe allergic reaction*

Serious side effects from Xgeva aren’t common, but they are possible. If you have serious side effects, call your doctor right away. However, if you’re having a medical emergency or your symptoms feel life threatening, call 911 or a local emergency number.

* To learn more about allergic reaction, see below.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after receiving Xgeva. A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible.

Possible symptoms of mild and serious allergic reactions are listed in the table below.

Mild allergic reaction symptoms Serious allergic reaction symptoms
flushing • swelling under your skin, possibly in your hands, feet, lips, or eyelids
rash • swelling in your throat or mouth
• itching trouble breathing

If you have an allergic reaction to Xgeva, call your doctor right away. This is important because the reaction could become severe.

However, if you’re having a medical emergency or your symptoms feel life threatening, call 911 or a local emergency number.

Xgeva: Dosage

Below, you’ll find dosages that are commonly recommended for Xgeva. However, your doctor will prescribe the dosage that’s best for your needs.

The dosage of Xgeva that your doctor prescribes will depend on the condition you’re using Xgeva to treat.

Xgeva’s form

Xgeva comes as a solution in a single-dose vial. It’s given as a subcutaneous injection by a healthcare professional. You’ll receive Xgeva injections in your doctor’s office or clinic.

Xgeva’s strength: 120 mg/1.7 mL

Xgeva is available in one strength: 120 milligrams (mg) per 1.7 milliliters (mL) of solution.

Xgeva’s recommended dosages

Recommended dosages for Xgeva in adults and children are described below.

Adult dosage

The recommended dosages for Xgeva in adults are as follows.

Use Dosage
preventing bone problems due to multiple myeloma (bone marrow cancer) 120 mg once every 4 weeks
preventing bone problems due to bone metastasis (cancer that’s spread to the bones) from solid tumors 120 mg once every 4 weeks
treating giant cell tumors of bone 120 mg once every 4 weeks, with extra doses of 120 mg on days 8 and 15 of the first month of treatment  
treating hypercalcemia (high calcium levels) caused by cancer 120 mg once every 4 weeks, with extra doses of 120 mg on days 8 and 15 of the first month of treatment  

Child dosage

The recommended dosage for Xgeva for giant cell tumors of bone in adolescents* whose bones have finished growing is as follows.

  • Dose: 120 mg
  • Frequency: once every 4 weeks, with extra doses of 120 mg on days 8 and 15 of the first month of treatment

* In this article, the term “adolescents” refers to children ages 12 to 16 years.

Dosage considerations

Below are some things to consider about Xgeva’s dosage.

  • Missing a dose. If you miss an appointment for a dose of Xgeva, call your doctor’s office right away to reschedule. Try these medication reminder options to help avoid missing appointments. You could also set an alarm or download a reminder app on your phone.
  • Length of treatment. Doctors typically prescribe Xgeva as a long-term treatment. You’ll likely take it long term if you and your doctor feel it’s safe and effective for your condition.

Xgeva: Alternatives

Doctors may prescribe drugs other than Xgeva for your condition. Certain drugs may work better for you than others.

Xgeva is used to treat several conditions, including certain bone problems due to multiple myeloma and bone metastases. (Multiple myeloma is a bone marrow cancer. Bone metastasis is cancer that’s spread to the bones.)

Here’s information about treatments that doctors sometimes prescribe for multiple myeloma. This is a summary of treatments used for complications of bone metastases.

For additional information about alternatives to Xgeva, ask your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that could be prescribed for your condition.

Xgeva vs. Prolia

You may wonder if Xgeva and Prolia are similar or different. These medications both contain the same active drug, but they have different approved uses. View this detailed comparison to learn more.

Xgeva vs. Zometa

To learn more about Zometa, an alternative to Xgeva, see this article.

Xgeva: Cost

As with other medications, prices for Xgeva may vary. The drug’s price will depend on factors such as:

  • where you receive Xgeva
  • your insurance coverage

Cost considerations for Xgeva

Here are some things to consider when looking into the cost of Xgeva.

Need for prior authorization. Before insurance coverage for Xgeva is approved, your insurance company may require prior authorization. In this case, your doctor and insurance company will communicate about your prescription for Xgeva. Then, the insurance company will decide if the drug will be covered. To find out if you need prior authorization for Xgeva, contact your insurance company.

Possible cost assistance options. Financial assistance to help lower the cost of Xgeva is available. The Amgen First Step program for Xgeva may help reduce its cost. To learn more and see if you’re eligible for support, visit the manufacturer’s website. Also, check out this article to learn about ways to save on prescription drugs.

Availability of a generic or biosimilar form. Xgeva is a biologic medication, which is also called a biologic. It doesn’t come in a biosimilar form.

Biologic drugs are made from living cells. It’s not possible to copy these drugs exactly. A biosimilar medication is a drug that’s similar to a brand-name biologic drug (the parent drug). A generic, on the other hand, is a drug made from chemicals rather than living cells. A generic is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. 

Like generics, biosimilars are considered to be just as safe and effective as their parent drug. Biosimilars also tend to cost less than brand-name medications.

Xgeva: Questions you may have

Here are some common questions about Xgeva and brief answers to them. If you’d like to know more about these topics, ask your doctor.

When should you stop Xgeva?

Doctors typically prescribe Xgeva as a long-term treatment. You’ll usually keep receiving it for as long as it continues to help your condition.

However, your doctor may recommend stopping Xgeva if you have serious side effects or side effects that are bothersome to you. In this case, your doctor may recommend switching to a different treatment.

In addition, your doctor may recommend pausing Xgeva treatment in certain situations, such as before invasive dental procedures. These procedures may include tooth extraction or dental surgery. In these cases, your doctor may recommend stopping Xgeva for a period of time. This is to help prevent a serious jaw problem called osteonecrosis, which is a possible side effect of Xgeva. To learn more about this, see “Xgeva: Precautions” below.

Do doctors prescribe Xgeva for prostate cancer or breast cancer?

Not exactly. Doctors don’t prescribe Xgeva to treat prostate cancer or breast cancer. Instead, they may prescribe it to treat certain complications of these cancers. Xgeva doesn’t treat the cancer itself.

Breast cancer and prostate cancer can often spread to the bones. This can weaken the bones and raise the risk of fractures. Xgeva helps to stop bone from breaking down. Doctors prescribe it to help protect the bones and prevent fractures in people with breast or prostate cancer that’s spread to the bones.

Breast and prostate cancer can also cause hypercalcemia (high calcium levels). This is especially the case if these cancers have spread to the bones. Doctors prescribe Xgeva to help lower calcium levels in people with breast or prostate cancer who have hypercalcemia.

Are Xgeva and Faslodex taken together?

Yes, they sometimes are.

Fulvestrant (Faslodex) is a drug that’s used to treat certain types of hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer. If you take Faslodex to treat breast cancer, your doctor might also prescribe Xgeva if you have certain complications with your breast cancer.

For example, if your breast cancer has spread to your bones, your doctor may prescribe Xgeva. This may be done to help prevent bone problems such as fractures. If you have hypercalcemia (high calcium levels) caused by your breast cancer, your doctor may prescribe Xgeva. This may be done to help lower your calcium levels.

Does Xgeva treat osteoporosis?

No, Xgeva isn’t approved to treat osteoporosis. However, Xgeva contains the same active drug as Prolia, a medication that is used to treat osteoporosis. This active drug is called denosumab.

Xgeva and Prolia contain different strengths of denosumab and are used in different dosages. So, they’re not interchangeable.

If you’re interested in finding a treatment for osteoporosis, talk with your doctor.

Will Xgeva cause bone pain?

It might. In clinical studies, bone pain, especially back pain, joint pain, and pain in the arms or legs, were common side effects of Xgeva. Some people have reported severe bone pain while receiving Xgeva. It’s not known how often bone pain occurs with Xgeva.

However, it’s important to note that bone pain is common with cancer affecting the bones. The pain is caused by cancer damaging the bones. Xgeva helps prevent further damage to the bones, so it may help prevent bone pain from worsening.

If you have bone pain that’s bothersome or severe while receiving Xgeva, talk with your doctor. They can recommend a suitable pain reliever.

Note that if you have any new or unusual pain in your thigh, hip, or groin while receiving Xgeva, you should see your doctor right away. This could be a symptom of a fracture in your thigh bone. Rarely, unusual thigh bone fractures have been reported with Xgeva. (These are bone breaks that happen with a minor injury or no obvious cause.) If you have thigh, hip, or groin pain, your doctor will likely order X-rays to check for fractures.

As well, if you have pain in your jaw, you should call your doctor right away. This could be a symptom of a serious side effect of Xgeva called osteonecrosis in your jaw. (Osteonecrosis is death of bone tissue.) If your doctor suspects you have this side effect, they’ll likely refer you to a dentist.

Xgeva: Uses

Prescription drugs, such as Xgeva, are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat certain conditions. A drug’s approved uses are called its indications.

Using Xgeva for multiple myeloma

Xgeva is FDA-approved to help prevent bone problems, such as fractures, in adults with multiple myeloma.

Multiple myeloma is a type of cancer that affects plasma cells found inside the bone marrow. (Plasma cells are a type of white blood cell. Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside the bones where blood cells are formed.)

With multiple myeloma, cancerous plasma cells build up in the bone marrow and form tumors in the bones. This damages and weakens the bones, raising the risk of fractures. Multiple myeloma typically starts in the spine and spreads to many bones throughout the body.

Symptoms of multiple myeloma may include:

  • bone pain, especially in the back or ribs
  • fractures (due to weak bones that break easily)
  • fever
  • frequent infection
  • shortness of breath
  • fatigue
  • bruising or bleeding easily
  • weakness in the arms or legs

Xgeva is a medication that helps prevent bone breakdown. Doctors prescribe it to help protect the bones and prevent bone problems caused by multiple myeloma. These problems include:

  • fractures
  • spinal cord compression (pressure on your spinal cord, which may cause bowel or bladder problems, pain, weakness, numbness, or paralysis)
  • need for radiation therapy or surgery on the bones

Using Xgeva for bone metastasis due to certain cancers

Xgeva is FDA-approved to help prevent bone problems, such as fractures, in adults with bone metastasis from solid tumors. (Bone metastasis is cancer that’s spread to the bones.)

Solid cancer tumors are cancers that form lumps, such as breast, prostate, or lung cancer. With advanced forms of these cancers, the cancer cells may travel from the original tumor. It can move to other parts of the body through the blood. When cancer spreads to the bones, it can damage and weaken them, raising the risk of fractures.

The most common bones for solid tumors to spread to include the spine, pelvis, thigh bones, ribs, and skull.

Symptoms of bone metastasis from solid tumors may include:

  • bone pain, especially in the back, hips, or ribs
  • fractures (due to weak bones that break easily)

Xgeva is a medication that helps prevent bone breakdown. Doctors prescribe it to help protect the bones and prevent bone problems caused by bone metastasis. These problems include:

  • fractures
  • spinal cord compression (pressure on your spinal cord, which may cause bowel or bladder problems, pain, weakness, numbness, or paralysis)
  • need for radiation therapy or surgery on the bones

Using Xgeva for hypercalcemia due to certain cancers

Xgeva is FDA-approved to treat hypercalcemia (high calcium levels) caused by cancer in adults. This condition is also called hypercalcemia of malignancy. Xgeva is approved to treat this condition when other treatments called bisphosphonates haven’t worked well enough.

Hypercalcemia is a common complication of cancer, especially multiple myeloma (bone marrow cancer). It’s also common with bone metastasis (cancer that’s spread to the bones) from advanced forms of other cancers.

When cancer affects the bones, it damages and breaks down the bone tissue. This causes calcium to be released into the blood. If calcium builds up in the blood, this can lead to hypercalcemia.

Hypercalcemia can affect many parts of the body, especially the kidneys, nerves, muscles, heart, digestive system, and brain. If not treated, hypercalcemia can cause serious or even life threatening problems.

Symptoms of hypercalcemia may include:

  • thirst
  • frequent urination
  • nausea and vomiting
  • loss of appetite
  • fatigue
  • muscle weakness
  • confusion
  • abnormal heart rhythm

Xgeva is a medication that helps prevent bone breakdown. This helps reduce the amount of calcium that’s released into the blood. Doctors prescribe Xgeva to help lower calcium levels in people with hypercalcemia of malignancy.

Using Xgeva for giant cell tumors of bone

Xgeva is FDA-approved to treat giant cell tumors of bone in adults and adolescents* whose bones have finished growing. Xgeva is approved to treat these tumors when:

  • the tumor can’t be fully removed with surgery, or
  • surgical treatment will likely be disabling

Giant cell tumors of bone are a rare type of primary bone tumor (tumor that starts in the bones). They are usually benign (noncancerous). They may rarely become malignant (cancerous).

Giant cells are a type of cell that forms when several individual cells join together. With giant cell tumors of bone, giant cells increase in numbers and form a fast-growing tumor. The tumor can damage and weaken the bone, which raises the risk of fractures.

Giant cell tumors usually affect the ends of the long bones in the arms or legs. They often develop near a joint, such as the knee, hip, wrist, or shoulder.

Symptoms of a giant cell tumor of bone can include:

  • a lump that you can see or feel
  • bone pain
  • bone fracture
  • swelling, pain, and reduced movement in the joint closest to the tumor

Xgeva is a targeted treatment for giant cell tumors of bone. The medication stops the tumor growing and damaging the bone. It can also make the tumor shrink. Doctors sometimes prescribe Xgeva to help shrink this type of tumor so that it can be removed with surgery.

* In this article, the term “adolescents” refers to children ages 12 to 16 years.

Taking Xgeva with other drugs or therapies

If you take Xgeva for a complication of cancer, you’ll likely take it with other drugs or therapies that treat the cancer itself. This could be the case if you have bone problems or high calcium levels due to cancer.

Your doctor can tell you if you’ll take Xgeva with other drugs or therapies.

Using Xgeva in children

In children, Xgeva is only approved to treat giant cell bone tumors. It’s approved for this use in adolescents* whose bones have stopped growing. Xgeva is not approved for any other uses in children.

Xgeva may cause side effects if used in children whose bones are still growing, or for unapproved uses in children. The drug may prevent the normal growth of bones and teeth in these children. It may also cause serious hypercalcemia (high calcium levels) after the drug is stopped.

* In this article, the term “adolescents” refers to children ages 12 to 16 years.

Finding a healthcare professional for Xgeva

If you’re interested in taking Xgeva, you can find a doctor who may prescribe it by searching here. To prepare for your appointment, you may find it helpful to visit the appointment guide for cancer.

Xgeva: How it works

Xgeva is used to manage certain complications of cancer. It’s used to:

  • help prevent bone problems such as fractures in multiple myeloma (bone marrow cancer) or bone metastasis (cancer that’s spread to the bones)
  • treat hypercalcemia (high calcium levels) caused by cancer
  • treat giant cell tumors of bone, a rare type of bone tumor that’s usually benign (noncancerous)

The way Xgeva works is called its mechanism of action.

What happens when cancer affects the bone

Bone tissue usually goes through continual turnover. Cells called osteoclasts break down old bone tissue, and cells called osteoblasts replace it with new bone tissue. The turnover process is regulated by certain proteins. When cancer affects the bone, this process doesn’t work like usual.

Cancer cells in the bone increase the activity of a protein called RANKL. This protein sends signals that increase the formation, activity, and survival of osteoclasts. As a result, it increases bone breakdown, which damages and weakens the bones. This raises the risk of bone problems, such as fractures. It also causes calcium to be released into the blood from the damaged bone. This can cause hypercalcemia (high calcium levels).

With giant cell tumors of bone, the giant cells act like osteoclasts. This damages and weakens the bone, which raises the risk of fractures. As with osteoclasts, RANKL increases the formation, activity, and survival of giant cells. As a result, RANKL increases the growth of this type of tumor.

How Xgeva works to manage certain complications of cancer

Xgeva works by blocking the action of the RANKL protein. As a result, its effect on osteoclasts is decreased. This helps reduce bone breakdown. In turn, this helps to keep the bones strong and prevent problems such as fractures. It also reduces the release of calcium into the blood, which helps lower high calcium levels.

How Xgeva works to treat giant cell tumors of bone

Xgeva works by blocking the action of the RANKL protein. As a result, the formation, activity, and survival of the giant cells are reduced. This helps reduce bone breakdown and shrink the tumor.

How long does Xgeva take to start working?

Xgeva starts working soon after your first injection, although you’re unlikely to notice it working. Your doctor will order various tests from time to time to check that Xgeva is helping treat your condition.

Xgeva: Consuming alcohol during treatment

Xgeva hasn’t been reported to interact with alcohol. However, drinking alcohol while you’re receiving this medication may increase certain side effects. These include headache, nausea, and diarrhea.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much is safe to consume while you’re receiving Xgeva.

Xgeva: Interactions

Xgeva isn’t known to interact with other medications, supplements, or foods. However, this doesn’t mean interactions can’t occur with Xgeva.

Different interactions can cause different effects. Some interactions can interfere with a drug’s effectiveness. Others can increase a drug’s side effects or cause them to be severe.

Before you start Xgeva, be sure to tell your doctor about any medications, herbs, vitamins, or supplements you take. They can check for any possible interactions between these products and Xgeva.

For information about drug-condition interactions, see the “Xgeva: Precautions” section below.

Xgeva: How it is given

Your doctor will recommend how you’ll be given Xgeva. It’s important to receive the drug exactly as your doctor instructs.

Xgeva is given by subcutaneous injection. A healthcare professional will administer the injection in your upper arm, upper thigh, or abdomen. You’ll typically receive Xgeva injections in your doctor’s office or clinic.

Questions about receiving Xgeva

Here’s a list of common questions related to receiving Xgeva.

  • When should I take Xgeva? Your healthcare professional will typically administer one injection of Xgeva once every 4 weeks. For some conditions, you may also be given one injection on day 8 and day 15 of your first month of treatment. Try these medication reminder options to help avoid missing appointments to have doses of Xgeva. You could also set an alarm or download a reminder app on your phone.
  • Do I need to take Xgeva with food? No, you don’t. It doesn’t matter when you eat in relation to having your injection of Xgeva.
  • Is there a best time of day to take Xgeva? No, there’s not. You can receive your injection of Xgeva at any time of day on your scheduled day.

Xgeva: Using while pregnant

Xgeva is not safe to take during pregnancy. Based on animal studies and the way it works, Xgeva may harm a fetus if used during pregnancy.

If you can become pregnant, your doctor will likely order a pregnancy test for you before you use Xgeva.

If you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant, your doctor will likely not prescribe Xgeva. Talk with your doctor about alternative treatment options for your condition.

Xgeva: Birth control needs

Xgeva is not safe to take during pregnancy. Talk with your doctor about your birth control needs with Xgeva if you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant. Your doctor can recommend if you should use birth control with this medication.

If you’d like to learn more about taking Xgeva during pregnancy, see the “Xgeva: Using while pregnant” section above.

Note: Sex and gender exist on spectrums. In this article, use of the terms “male” and “female” refers to sex assigned at birth.

For females taking Xgeva

Females taking Xgeva should use birth control during treatment with Xgeva. They should continue using birth control for 5 months after their last dose.

For males taking Xgeva

Xgeva’s manufacturer doesn’t give birth control recommendations for males taking Xgeva. If you’re taking Xgeva and are sexually active with someone who’s able to become pregnant, talk with your doctor. They can discuss your birth control needs while you’re using this drug.

Xgeva: Using while breastfeeding

Doctors don’t know if Xgeva is safe to take while breastfeeding. It’s not known if the drug can pass into breast milk or if it can affect breast milk production.

If you’re breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed, talk with your doctor. They can recommend the best ways to feed your child while you’re taking Xgeva.

Xgeva: Precautions

Tell your doctor about your health history before starting treatment with Xgeva. Your doctor may not recommend this medication if you have certain factors affecting your health or specific medical conditions. These situations are considered drug-condition interactions.

These factors and conditions include those listed below.

  • Hypocalcemia (low calcium levels). Xgeva can sometimes cause hypocalcemia. If you already have this, your doctor will likely prescribe medication to treat it before you start Xgeva. Your doctor will monitor your calcium level during treatment with the drug.
  • Kidney problems. If you have kidney problems, you may have a raised risk for hypocalcemia with Xgeva. Your doctor will monitor your calcium and vitamin D levels during treatment with the drug.
  • Allergic reaction. Your doctor will likely not prescribe Xgeva if you’ve had an allergic reaction to it or any of its ingredients. To find out about other treatment options, talk with your doctor.
  • Treatment with Prolia. Xgeva contains the same active drug (denosumab) as Prolia. If you’re taking Prolia, your doctor will likely not prescribe Xgeva. To find out about other treatment options, talk with your doctor.
  • Risk for osteonecrosis of the jaw. Xgeva can sometimes cause jaw and dental problems due to a serious side effect called osteonecrosis in the jaw. (Osteonecrosis is death of bone tissue.) You may have an increased risk of this if you have diabetes, reduced oral health, or wear dentures. Having invasive dental procedures can also raise your risk for this. (Examples include tooth extractions or dental implants.) In addition, taking certain medications can raise your risk, including immunosuppressants, angiogenesis inhibitors, and corticosteroids. It’s important to have healthy oral hygiene while using Xgeva. If you need an invasive dental procedure, talk with your doctor. They may recommend stopping Xgeva temporarily to lower your risk for osteonecrosis.
  • Risk for spinal fractures after stopping Xgeva. Spinal fractures have occurred in some people after stopping Xgeva treatment. You may have a raised risk for spinal fractures if you have a history of osteoporosis or fractures. You shouldn’t stop taking Xgeva without discussing this with your doctor first.
  • Pregnancy. Xgeva is not safe to use during pregnancy. If you’d like additional information about taking Xgeva while pregnant, view the “Xgeva: Using while pregnant” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. Doctors don’t know whether Xgeva is safe to use during breastfeeding. If you’d like additional information about taking Xgeva while breastfeeding, view the “Xgeva: Using while breastfeeding” section above.

To learn more about effects of Xgeva that could be harmful, see the “Xgeva: Side effects” section above.

Xgeva: Questions for your doctor

If you have questions about Xgeva, talk with your doctor. They can help advise you on whether Xgeva could be a good treatment option for you.

Here’s a list of questions you may want to ask your doctor:

  • Do I have a high risk for serious side effects with Xgeva?
  • Should I see a dentist before starting Xgeva?
  • Will I need to take any other medications with Xgeva?

Your doctor may also tell you about other treatment options for your condition. You may find this article helpful in learning about treatment options for multiple myeloma. And view our selection of videos on cancer treatment.

Disclaimer: Healthgrades has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.

Medical Reviewer: Heather Bruce, PharmD
Last Review Date: 2022 Aug 13
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.