Vyvanse’s Side Effects: What to Know

Medically Reviewed By Heather Bruce, PharmD

Vyvanse has a boxed warning for misuse and dependence. This is a serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Misuse means taking a medication differently from how your doctor prescribed it. Dependence means your body relies on a drug in order to function like usual.

For details, see the “ Vyvanse: Side effects explained” section below.

Vyvanse: Introduction

Vyvanse is a brand-name prescription drug. It’s a type of drug called a central nervous system stimulant. It contains the active drug lisdexamfetamine.

Vyvanse comes as an oral capsule and chewable tablet.

It’s approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat:

Doctors may prescribe Vyvanse as a long-term treatment. Similar to other drugs, Vyvanse may cause side effects. Read below for information about possible side effects, including common, mild, and serious ones.


For a general overview of Vyvanse, including details about its uses, see this article.

If you’d like to take Vyvanse, search here to find a healthcare professional who might prescribe it.

Vyvanse: More common side effects

Some of Vyvanse’s side effects may be more common than others. These side effects may last only a few days to weeks. However, some side effects may last longer or become severe or bothersome. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have concerns about any side effects with Vyvanse.

Some of the more common side effects of Vyvanse that occurred during clinical studies are listed below. These side effects can vary depending on the condition Vyvanse is treating.

More common side effects of Vyvanse in adults with binge eating disorder include:

More common side effects of Vyvanse in adults† with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) include:

* For more information about this side effect, see “Vyvanse: Side effects explained” below.
† Vyvanse is also prescribed for certain children with ADHD. For more information about side effects in children taking the drug, see “Vyvanse: Side effects in adults vs. children” below.

Vyvanse: Mild side effects

Vyvanse can cause mild side effects, which are listed below. However, this list doesn’t include all possible mild side effects. To learn more about Vyvanse’s side effects, view the drug’s prescribing information.

Vyvanse’s mild side effects include:

The side effects listed above may last only a few days to weeks. However, some side effects may last longer or become severe or bothersome. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have concerns about side effects with Vyvanse.


Note: After the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves a drug, it tracks and reviews side effects of the medication. If you develop a side effect while taking Vyvanse and want to tell the FDA about it, visit MedWatch.

* For more information about this side effect, see “Vyvanse: Side effects explained” below.

Vyvanse: Serious side effects

It’s possible to have serious side effects with Vyvanse. Serious side effects are listed below, but this list may not include all possibilities. To learn more about Vyvanse’s side effects, view the drug’s prescribing information.

Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects with Vyvanse. However, if you think you’re having a medical emergency or have life threatening side effects, call 911 or your local emergency number.

Serious side effects of Vyvanse and their possible symptoms include:

  • Mental health conditions, such as mania, psychosis, anxiety, and depression. Symptoms can include:
    • euphoria
    • feelings of excessive worry, fear, panic, or dread
    • changes in energy levels, such as having low or high energy
    • loss of interest in activities that were once enjoyable
    • speaking faster than usual
    • compulsive behavior, such as excessive spending
    • delusions (believing things that aren’t real)
    • hallucination (seeing or hearing things that aren’t real)
  • Reduced blood flow to your fingers and toes, including that of Raynaud’s phenomenon. Symptoms can include:
    • skin that looks blue, gray, or paler than usual on your nose, ears, lips, fingers, or toes
    • cold fingers or toes
    • numbness, pain, or tingling in your fingers or toes
  • Serious heart problems, such as rare cases of heart attack or stroke. Symptoms can include:
  • Risk of misuse and dependence.*

* Vyvanse has a boxed warning for this side effect. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To learn more, see the “Vyvanse: Side effects explained” section below.
† An allergic reaction is possible after taking Vyvanse. However, this side effect was not reported in clinical studies. To learn more, see the “Vyvanse: Side effects explained” section below.

Vyvanse: Side effects in males vs. females

Most of Vyvanse’s side effects are expected to be the same in both males and females who take it.*

However, Vyvanse may cause different sexual side effects in males and females. For details, see the “Vyvanse: Side effects explained” section below.

Additionally, Vyvanse may cause harmful side effects if taken during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. To learn more, see the “Vyvanse: Precautions” section below.

If you’re concerned about your risk of side effects with Vyvanse, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. In this article, use of the terms “male” and “female” refers to sex assigned at birth.

Vyvanse: Side effects in adults vs. children

Vyvanse is approved to treat moderate to severe binge eating disorder in adults only. However, it’s also approved to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and children ages 6 years and older.

Many side effects of Vyvanse are expected to be the same in children and adults. For lists of the drug’s possible side effects, see “Vyvanse: Mild side effects” and “Vyvanse: Serious side effects” above.

However, certain side effects of Vyvanse may be more common in children than in adults. Examples of these include:

Additionally, Vyvanse may cause delayed growth in children. Doctors will closely monitor the weight and height of children taking Vyvanse. They’ll compare these measurements with the average growth rates expected for a child’s age. If a child’s doctor finds signs of delayed growth, they may have the child stop taking Vyvanse.


If you have questions about how Vyvanse may affect your child, talk with their doctor or a pharmacist.

Vyvanse: Common questions about side effects

Here are some common questions about the drug’s side effects and answers to them. Talk with your doctor if you have other questions about this drug.

Does Vyvanse have long-term side effects?

In rare cases, Vyvanse may cause long-term side effects. These include side effects that happen after you’ve taken the drug for a long time or ones that continue after you’ve stopped treatment.

Possible long-term side effects of Vyvanse include:

If you’re concerned about long-term side effects with Vyvanse, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.


* To learn more, see the “Vyvanse: Side effects in adults vs. children” section above.

Will I have weight gain with Vyvanse?

It’s not likely. Weight gain wasn’t reported by people taking Vyvanse in clinical studies. However, weight loss was commonly reported.

To learn more about possible weight changes with Vyvanse, talk with your doctor. They can recommend ways to maintain a body weight that’s healthy for you while you’re taking the drug.

Is euphoria a side effect of Vyvanse?

Euphoria itself probably isn’t a side effect of Vyvanse. Feeling euphoric wasn’t reported in the drug’s clinical studies.

However, Vyvanse may cause certain mental health conditions as a side effect. These include mania, which may have euphoria as a symptom. (Mania describes periods of high energy and excitement, usually related to bipolar disorder.)

Your risk of developing mania with Vyvanse may be higher if you have bipolar disorder. Before taking Vyvanse, tell your doctor about any mental health conditions you have. They’ll advise if it’s safe for you to take Vyvanse.

Additionally, some people who misuse stimulant drugs may experience euphoria. Vyvanse is a stimulant drug, and it has a boxed warning for a risk of misuse and dependence.* To learn more, see the “Vyvanse: Side effects explained” section below.

* A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Misuse means taking a medication differently from how your doctor prescribed it. Dependence means your body relies on a drug in order to function like usual.

Does Vyvanse cause hair loss, especially in females?

Possibly. Hair loss wasn’t reported as a side effect in clinical studies of Vyvanse. However, it has been reported since the drug became available for use.

That said, it isn’t known for sure if hair loss with Vyvanse is more common in females than in males.* This hasn’t been compared or reported in clinical studies.

If you’re concerned about hair loss with Vyvanse, talk with your doctor. They can advise on your risk for this side effect and suggest ways to manage it.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. In this article, use of the terms “male” and “female” refers to sex assigned at birth.

Can memory loss occur with Vyvanse?

Probably not. Memory loss wasn’t reported in clinical studies of Vyvanse.

Keep in mind that forgetfulness and poor memory are symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which Vyvanse is approved to treat. So, you could have memory problems while taking Vyvanse because of this condition. Memory loss may not be caused by Vyvanse alone.

If you have memory loss while taking Vyvanse, talk with your doctor. They’ll likely check for possible causes and suggest ways to manage it.

Will Vyvanse make me have jaw clenching?

Maybe. Jaw clenching wasn’t reported as a side effect in clinical studies of Vyvanse.

However, teeth grinding has been reported after the drug’s clinical studies were completed. And jaw clenching often occurs in combination with teeth grinding.

If you have bothersome jaw clenching or teeth grinding while taking Vyvanse, talk with your doctor. They’ll likely check for possible causes. If your doctor feels Vyvanse is causing this side effect, they may suggest a different treatment for your condition.

Vyvanse: Side effects explained

Here’s detailed information about some of Vyvanse’s side effects.

Risk of misuse and dependence

Vyvanse has a boxed warning for the risk of misuse and dependence. This is a serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Misuse means taking a medication differently from how your doctor prescribed it. Dependence means your body relies on a drug in order to function like usual.

Misuse and dependence weren’t reported as side effects in clinical studies of Vyvanse. However, stimulant drugs, such as Vyvanse, are known to have a high risk of misuse and dependence.

Below are possible symptoms of Vyvanse misuse:

It may not be safe for people with current or past dependence or alcohol use disorder to take Vyvanse. These conditions can increase the risk of dependence with Vyvanse.

If Vyvanse is suddenly stopped after someone’s body has become dependent on it, withdrawal symptoms may occur. Examples include fatigue and depression.

What you can do

Before you start taking Vyvanse, tell your doctor about your medical history. They’ll determine your risk of misuse and dependence with Vyvanse. And they’ll continue to monitor your risk from time to time while you’re taking the drug.

If you have symptoms of Vyvanse misuse, tell your doctor right away. They may lower your dosage of Vyvanse or prescribe a different medication for you instead. However, if you have thoughts of harming yourself or others, call 911 or your local emergency number right away.

It’s important that you do not stop taking Vyvanse unless your doctor tells you it’s safe to do so. If your doctor feels it’s safe, they may lower your dosage slowly over time. This will reduce your risk of having withdrawal symptoms when the drug is stopped.

If you’re concerned about your risk of misuse and dependence with Vyvanse, talk with your doctor.

Suicide prevention

If you know someone at immediate risk of self-harm, suicide, or hurting another person:

  • Ask the tough question: “Are you considering suicide?”
  • Listen to the person without judgment.
  • Call 911 or the local emergency number, or text TALK to 741741 to communicate with a trained crisis counselor.
  • Stay with the person until professional help arrives.
  • Try to remove any weapons, medications, or other potentially harmful objects.

If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, a prevention hotline can help. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24 hours per day at 800-273-8255. During a crisis, people who are hard of hearing can use their preferred relay service or dial 711 then 800-273-8255.

Click here for more links and local resources.

Headache

Headache is a possible side effect of Vyvanse. However, it was less common than other side effects in the drug’s clinical studies.

What you can do

Headaches from Vyvanse may go away once your body gets used to the drug or shortly after you stop taking it. That said, if you have severe or long-lasting headaches, talk with your doctor. They may suggest you take a pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil).

Nausea and upper abdominal pain

Nausea and upper abdominal pain may occur with Vyvanse. Upper abdominal pain was a common side effect in clinical studies of the drug, while nausea was less common.

What you can do

If you find that Vyvanse causes nausea or abdominal pain, try taking your dose with food. (Vyvanse can be taken with or without food.) Doing so may help ease your symptoms.

If you have bothersome nausea or upper abdominal pain while taking Vyvanse, talk with your doctor. They can suggest treatments or other ways to ease your symptoms.

Constipation

Constipation is a possible side effect of Vyvanse. This was one of the most common side effects in clinical studies of the drug.

Symptoms of constipation may include:

What you can do

If you have bothersome constipation with Vyvanse, talk with your doctor. They can recommend ways to ease your symptoms. For example, doctors may suggest over-the-counter (OTC) treatments such as laxatives or stool softeners.

Below are a few examples of OTC laxatives and stool softeners:

Sexual side effects

Sexual side effects are possible with Vyvanse. However, these were less common in clinical studies of the drug.

In males and females,* Vyvanse may cause reduced libido (low sex drive). And in males, Vyvanse may cause erectile dysfunction (trouble getting or keeping an erection).

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. In this article, use of the terms “male” and “female” refers to sex assigned at birth.

What you can do

Sexual side effects with Vyvanse could be short term. They may go away once your body gets used to the drug or shortly after you stop taking it.

However, if you have sexual side effects that are long lasting, talk with your doctor. They can recommend ways to manage your symptoms, or they may switch you to a drug other than Vyvanse.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Vyvanse. A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible.

This side effect wasn’t reported in clinical studies of Vyvanse. However, allergic reaction has been reported since the drug became available for use.

Possible symptoms of mild and serious allergic reactions are listed in the table below.

Mild allergic reaction symptoms Serious allergic reaction symptoms
• itching trouble breathing
rash • swelling in your throat or mouth
flushing • swelling under your skin, possibly in your hands, feet, lips, or eyelids

If you have an allergic reaction to Vyvanse, call your doctor right away. This is important to do because the reaction could become severe.

However, if you’re having a medical emergency or your symptoms feel life threatening, call 911 or a local emergency number.

Vyvanse: Precautions

Vyvanse comes with several precautions.

Boxed warning: Risk of misuse and dependence

This drug has a boxed warning for misuse and dependence. This is a serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Misuse means taking a medication differently from how your doctor prescribed it. Dependence means your body relies on a drug in order to function like usual.

For details, see the “Vyvanse: Side effects explained” section above.

Other precautions

Be sure to talk with your doctor about your health history before you take Vyvanse. This drug may not be the right treatment option for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors that affect your health.

The conditions and factors to consider include those described below.

Mental health conditions, including bipolar disorder or psychosis. If you or a family member has a mental health condition such as psychosis or bipolar disorder, tell your doctor before starting Vyvanse. The drug can increase your risk of psychosis or mania (periods of high energy and excitement, usually related to bipolar disorder). Talk with your doctor about your risk of these side effects while you’re taking Vyvanse.

Kidney problems. Before starting Vyvanse, tell your doctor if you have kidney problems. If your kidneys are not working well, your body may not get rid of Vyvanse as well as usual. This can cause Vyvanse to build up in your body, raising your risk of side effects. Your doctor may need to adjust your dosage of Vyvanse. They may also watch you more closely for side effects from Vyvanse.

Heart problems. If you or a family member has heart problems, talk with your doctor before taking Vyvanse. Examples include high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythm, and coronary artery disease (CAD). Vyvanse can cause heart problems, including increased heart rate and high blood pressure. Your risk of these side effects may be higher if you already have heart problems before taking the drug. Your doctor will advise if it’s safe to take Vyvanse.

Problems with circulation. Vyvanse can cause reduced blood flow to your fingers and toes, including that of Raynaud’s phenomenon. If you already have problems with circulation, Vyvanse could worsen your condition. Be sure to tell your doctor if you or a family member has problems with circulation. They can determine if Vyvanse is the right treatment for you.

Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Vyvanse or any of its ingredients, your doctor will likely not prescribe Vyvanse. Ask your doctor what other medications may be better options for you.

Consuming alcohol during Vyvanse treatment

There aren’t any known interactions between alcohol and Vyvanse. However, it may be best to avoid alcohol while you’re taking the drug.

This is because alcohol is a depressant, whereas Vyvanse is a stimulant. (Depressants slow down certain systems in the body, while stimulants activate certain systems.) As a result, alcohol and Vyvanse may hide each other’s effects. This means drinking alcohol while taking Vyvanse could make it hard for you to:

  • keep track of the amount of alcohol you’ve had
  • tell if Vyvanse is working to treat your condition

Also, be sure to tell your doctor if you have a history of alcohol use disorder. This could increase your risk of misuse and dependence with Vyvanse.* To learn more, see the “Vyvanse: Side effects explained” section above.

If you have questions about consuming alcohol during Vyvanse treatment, talk with your doctor.

* Vyvanse has a boxed warning for this side effect. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Misuse means taking a medication differently from how your doctor prescribed it. Dependence means your body relies on a drug in order to function like usual.

Pregnancy and breastfeeding during Vyvanse treatment

It may not be safe to take Vyvanse during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. Below are details about taking the drug during these times.

Pregnancy and Vyvanse

It isn’t known if Vyvanse is safe to take during pregnancy. There haven’t been enough clinical studies in pregnant people to know for sure.

However, there have been reports of side effects in infants exposed to medications similar to Vyvanse during pregnancy. Examples of these side effects include low birth weight and premature birth.

If you’re pregnant or planning a pregnancy, talk with your doctor before taking Vyvanse. They can discuss the risks of taking the drug during pregnancy.

If you take Vyvanse during pregnancy, consider enrolling in the drug’s pregnancy registry. Pregnancy registries collect information on the safety of medications when used during pregnancy. To learn more, visit the registry website. You can also call 866-961-2388 or discuss the registry with your doctor.

Breastfeeding and Vyvanse

Doctors typically recommend that you avoid breastfeeding while taking Vyvanse. This is because the drug may pass into breast milk, possibly causing side effects in a breastfed child.

If you’re breastfeeding or planning to do so, talk with your doctor. They can recommend healthy ways to feed your child while you’re taking Vyvanse.

Vyvanse: Misuse

It’s possible that Vyvanse may be misused. Misuse means taking a medication differently from how your doctor prescribed it.

Misuse wasn’t reported as a side effect in clinical studies of Vyvanse. However, misuse can still happen with this medication. In fact, Vyvanse has a boxed warning for this side effect. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To learn more, see the “Vyvanse: Side effects explained” section above.

Before you start taking Vyvanse, tell your doctor about your medical history. They’ll determine your risk of misuse. Your doctor will continue to monitor your risk from time to time while you’re taking the drug.

If you’re concerned about your risk of misuse with Vyvanse, talk with your doctor.

Vyvanse: What to discuss with your doctor

Talk with your doctor or pharmacist to find out more information about Vyvanse. If you have questions about the drug’s side effects, your pharmacist or healthcare professional can help answer them for you.

In addition to discussing Vyvanse with your doctor, you may find the following articles helpful in learning more.

  • Overview of Vyvanse. To read an overview of Vyvanse, see this article.
  • Drug comparison. To learn how Vyvanse compares with Adderall, read this article. To see a comparison with Concerta, check out this article.  
  • Details about Vyvanse’s uses. To learn more about the conditions Vyvanse is approved to treat, see these articles about binge eating disorder and ADHD.

Disclaimer: Healthgrades has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.

Medical Reviewer: Heather Bruce, PharmD
Last Review Date: 2022 Apr 2
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.