Cimzia (certolizumab pegol)

Medically Reviewed By Alex Brewer, PharmD, MBA

This drug has boxed warnings, the most serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Boxed warnings alert doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Risk of serious infection. In rare cases, Cimzia may increase your risk of serious infections from bacteria, viruses, or fungi. Examples of these infections include tuberculosis (TB) and pneumonia. If you develop a serious infection, you may need hospital care. Although rare, these infections may be fatal.

Risk of cancer. Cimzia belongs to a group of drugs called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. Cancer has been reported in people ages 18 years or younger who took a TNF blocker. In rare cases, this was fatal. Cimzia is not approved for use in children.

To learn more, see the “ Cimzia: Precautions” section below.

About Cimzia

Cimzia is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat the following conditions in adults:

Cimzia is approved to treat these conditions in certain situations. For details about these conditions and how the drug treats them, see the “Cimzia: Uses” section below.

Key points

The following table provides key facts about Cimzia.

Active drug certolizumab pegol
Drug class tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker
Forms solution and powder that’s made into solution, which are given by subcutaneous injection

Finding a healthcare professional

If you’re interested in taking this drug, search here to find a doctor who might prescribe it.

Cimzia: Generic or biosimilar

Cimzia contains the active drug certolizumab pegol. It only comes as a brand-name medication. And it isn’t currently available as a biosimilar or generic drug.

A generic is an identical copy of the active drug found in a brand-name medication. Generics typically cost less than brand-name drugs.

A biosimilar medication is a drug that’s similar to a brand-name biologic drug (the parent drug). Cimzia is a biologic medication, which is also called a biologic.

Biologic drugs are made from living cells. It’s not possible to copy these drugs exactly. A generic, on the other hand, refers to drugs made from chemicals. A generic is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication.

Biosimilars are considered just as safe and effective as their parent drug. And like generics, biosimilars tend to cost less than brand-name medications.

Cimzia: Side effects

As with most drugs, it’s possible to have side effects with Cimzia. These can include some mild side effects, but also some serious ones.

To learn more about Cimzia’s side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They may also provide information about managing certain side effects of this drug.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Cimzia, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild and serious side effects

Mild and serious side effects of Cimzia are listed below. This article does not include all of Cimzia’s possible side effects.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Cimzia may include:

Most times, mild side effects of a drug go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if any side effects become severe or don’t go away.

* This is not a complete list of Cimzia’s mild side effects. To learn about other mild side effects of this drug, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Or you can view the drug’s prescribing information.
† To learn more about allergic reactions, see below. An allergic reaction is possible after taking Cimzia. However, it’s not clear whether this side effect occurred in clinical studies.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects of Cimzia may include:

Serious side effects from Cimzia aren’t common, but they are possible. If you have serious side effects, call your doctor right away. However, if you’re having a medical emergency or your symptoms feel life threatening, call 911 or a local emergency number.

* Cimzia has a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous. For more information about this side effect, see “Cimzia: Precautions” below.
† To learn more about allergic reactions, see below. An allergic reaction is possible after taking Cimzia. However, it’s not clear whether this side effect occurred in clinical studies.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Cimzia. A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible.

Possible symptoms of mild and serious allergic reactions are listed in the table below.

Mild allergic reaction symptoms Serious allergic reaction symptoms
flushing • swelling under your skin, possibly in your hands, feet, lips, or eyelids
rash • swelling in your throat or mouth
• itching trouble breathing

If you have an allergic reaction to Cimzia, call your doctor right away. This is important because the reaction could become severe.

However, if you’re having a medical emergency or your symptoms feel life threatening, call 911 or a local emergency number.

Cimzia: Uses

Prescription drugs, such as Cimzia, are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat certain conditions. A drug’s approved uses are also called its indications.

Doctors sometimes prescribe drugs off-label for other conditions. With off-label use, doctors prescribe a drug for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

Using Cimzia for plaque psoriasis

Cimzia is used to treat moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Specifically, doctors prescribe Cimzia for adults who could benefit from systemic (whole-body) therapy or phototherapy (light therapy).

Plaque psoriasis is the most common type of psoriasis. With this condition, you develop plaques, which are raised patches of thickened, scaly skin. It’s a chronic (long-term) autoimmune condition that causes your skin cells to turnover much faster than usual.

Plaques occur most often on the arms and around the elbows. Plaque psoriasis may also affect the skin on your knees, lower back, chest, scalp, ears, or genital area. 

On lighter skin, psoriasis plaques usually appear pink or red with white scales. On darker skin, they tend to be brown or purple with gray scales.

Using Cimzia for psoriatic arthritis

Cimzia is used to treat active psoriatic arthritis in adults.

Psoriatic arthritis is an autoimmune condition. With psoriatic arthritis, you may have joint pain, stiffness, and movement problems.

Other symptoms of psoriatic arthritis may include:

  • skin discoloration around affected joints
  • nail problems, such as the nail separating from your skin
  • muscle pain
  • swelling in fingers or toes
  • formation of plaques on skin

Using Cimzia for rheumatoid arthritis

Cimzia is used to treat moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in adults.

RA is an autoimmune condition. It causes pain, swelling, and stiffness in your joints, most often in your hands and feet. Typically, joints on both sides of the body are affected. Over time, joints may also become damaged.

RA can also cause damage and inflammation to blood vessels and organs, such as the heart or lungs.

Using Cimzia for Crohn’s disease

Cimzia is used to decrease the signs and symptoms of moderate to severe Crohn’s disease in adults. It’s also used to maintain remission (periods of little to no symptoms) in people with this condition.

Doctors typically prescribe Cimzia to adults whose symptoms haven’t improved with other treatments.

Crohn’s disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It’s a chronic (long-term) autoimmune condition that affects the gastrointestinal tract.

Symptoms of Crohn’s disease may include:

  • diarrhea, which may be bloody
  • abdominal pain and cramping
  • nutritional deficiencies, such as iron or vitamin deficiencies
  • weight loss
  • loss of appetite
  • rectal pain or bleeding
  • growth problems in children

Using Cimzia for ankylosing spondylitis

Cimzia is used to treat active ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in adults.

AS is a type of chronic (long-term) arthritis. It’s an autoimmune condition that causes inflammation in the spine. Over time, this inflammation can cause the spinal bones to fuse.

Symptoms of AS may include:

  • pain in the lower back and pelvis
  • stiffness that worsens during sleep or in the morning
  • trouble moving

With AS, doctors can see changes in your spine on an X-ray. Because of this, AS is also called radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (r-axSpA).

Using Cimzia for non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis

Cimzia is used to treat active non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA) in adults.

With nr-axSpA, you have pain and inflammation in the spine. This condition causes the same symptoms as ankylosing spondylitis (AS), described in “Using Cimzia for ankylosing spondylitis” above. The difference with nr-axSpA is that doctors cannot see any changes in your spine on an X-ray.

Doctors typically prescribe the drug for adults with certain signs of inflammation. Examples of these signs include:

Using Cimzia with other drugs

Doctors may prescribe Cimzia by itself to treat your condition. Or, they may prescribe Cimzia along with other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) that are not biologics. (Biologic drugs are made from living cells.) An example of a nonbiologic DMARD is methotrexate (Trexall).

Using Cimzia in children

Cimzia is not FDA-approved for use in children. The drug is only approved for use in adults.

Finding a healthcare professional for Cimzia

If you’re interested in Cimzia treatment, talk with your doctor. If you don’t currently have a doctor, you can search here to find a doctor or other healthcare professional. To get the most out of your appointment, you might want to prepare a list of questions ahead of time. For ideas on what to ask, check out the appointment guides for:

Cimzia: Dosage

Below, you’ll find dosages that are commonly recommended for Cimzia. However, you should take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. They’ll recommend the dosage that’s best for your needs.

The dosage of Cimzia that your doctor prescribes will depend on the condition you’re using Cimzia to treat and its severity. For plaque psoriasis, Cimzia’s dosage may also depend on your body weight.

Cimzia’s forms and strengths

Cimzia is available as follows.

  • Forms:
    • solution inside a syringe that’s given by subcutaneous injection
    • powder inside a vial, which is used to prepare a solution that’s given by subcutaneous injection
  • Strength:
    • 200 milligrams (mg) per 1 milliliter (mL) in each syringe
    • 200 mg in each vial

Cimzia injections are given by a healthcare professional, usually at a doctor’s office or clinic. Or, your doctor may show you how to give yourself Cimzia injections at home.

Keep in mind that you may need to receive two injections of Cimzia for each dose. For example, if your dose is 400 mg, you will receive two injections of 200 mg each.

Cimzia’s recommended dosages

Recommended dosages for Cimzia in adults are described below.

Condition Starting dosage Maintenance dosage
psoriatic arthritis
rheumatoid arthritis
ankylosing spondylitis
• non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis
400 mg initially and at weeks 2 and 4 of treatment 200 mg every 2 weeks or 400 mg every 4 weeks
Crohn’s disease 400 mg initially and at weeks 2 and 4 of treatment 400 mg every 4 weeks

The recommended dosage for plaque psoriasis may vary based on your body weight.

If you weigh 90 kilograms (kg) or less, your doctor may prescribe a starting dose of 400 mg. (One kg is equal to 2.2. pounds [lb]). It’s given once, and then 2 and 4 weeks later. Otherwise, your starting dose will be the same as your maintenance dose.

Doctors recommend the following maintenance dosages of Cimzia:

  • 400 mg once every other week, or
  • 200 mg once every other week, if your body weight is 90 kg or less and your doctor advises this

Dosage considerations

Below are some things to consider about Cimzia’s dosage.

  • Missing a dose. If you miss a dose of Cimzia, talk with your doctor. They can tell you when to take the missed injection or if you should skip it. Or, if you miss an appointment for a Cimzia injection, they’ll help you reschedule your appointment. Check out these medication reminder options to help avoid missing doses. You could also set an alarm, use a timer, or download a reminder app on your phone.
  • Length of treatment. Doctors typically prescribe Cimzia as a long-term treatment. You’ll likely take it long term if you and your doctor feel it’s safe and effective for your condition.

Cimzia: Cost

Similar to other medications, prices for Cimzia may vary. The drug’s price will depend on factors such as:

Cost considerations for Cimzia

Here’s a list of things to consider when looking into the cost of Cimzia.

  • Option for a 90-day supply. For some drugs, it’s possible to get a 90-day supply. If this option is approved by your insurance company, it can help lower the cost of the drug. It can also help you avoid frequent trips to your pharmacy. If you’d like to learn more about this option, ask your doctor, pharmacist, or insurance company.
  • Need for prior authorization. Before insurance coverage for Cimzia is approved, your insurance company may require prior authorization. In this case, your doctor and insurance company will communicate about your prescription for Cimzia. Then, the insurance company will decide if the drug will be covered. To find out if you need prior authorization for Cimzia, contact your insurance company.
  • Possible cost assistance options. Financial assistance to help lower the cost of Cimzia is available. The CIMplicity program may help reduce the drug’s cost. To learn more and see if you’re eligible for support, visit the drug manufacturer’s website. You can also check out this article to learn about ways to save on prescription drugs.
  • Use of a specialty pharmacy. Cimzia is only dispensed from specialty pharmacies. These pharmacies are authorized to handle certain drugs considered specialty medications. These medications may be expensive or require help from healthcare professionals to be used safely and effectively. Ask your doctor which specialty pharmacy they’ll prescribe Cimzia through.
  • Use of a mail-order pharmacy. Cimzia may be dispensed through mail-order pharmacies. Getting your prescription through a mail-order pharmacy could lower its cost. It can also allow you to get the drug without leaving home. To find out more about this option, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or insurance company.
  • Availability of a biosimilar form. Cimzia doesn’t come in a biosimilar or generic form. Biosimilars are like generic drugs, but for biologic medications. Typically, biosimilars cost less than the original biologic medication (parent drug).

Cimzia: Questions you may have

Here are some common questions about Cimzia and brief answers to them. If you’d like to know more about these topics, ask your doctor.

Does Cimzia come in a starter kit?

Yes, Cimzia is available in a starter kit, which requires a prescription from a healthcare professional.

This kit contains three doses of 400 milligrams (mg) of the drug in prefilled syringes. Each dose consists of two separate injections of 200 mg each. The kit also contains alcohol swabs that you’ll use to clean the skin before each injection. Your doctor will show you how to administer the drug so that you can give yourself Cimzia injections at home.

For more information about Cimzia dosing, see the “Cimzia: Dosage” section above.

Is weight gain a side effect of Cimzia?

Weight gain is not an expected side effect of Cimzia. This side effect wasn’t seen in people who took the drug in clinical studies.

If you’re taking Cimzia to treat Crohn’s disease and have weight gain, it could be a positive sign that the drug is helping to treat your condition. Weight loss and loss of appetite are symptoms of Crohn’s disease. And Cimzia is meant to reduce the symptoms of your condition.

It’s still a good idea to tell your doctor about any unexplained weight changes that occur during Cimzia treatment. While rare, this could be a symptom of the drug’s serious side effects. For example, a serious infection* may cause weight loss in some people. And sudden weight gain may be a sign of new or worsening heart failure.

* Cimzia has a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous. For more information about this side effect, see “Cimzia: Precautions” below.

Is Cimzia a biologic?

Yes, Cimzia is a biologic medication. Biologic drugs are made from living cells. In comparison, nonbiologic drugs are made from chemicals.

Cimzia is a monoclonal antibody. Monoclonal antibodies are lab-made proteins that are similar to natural immune system proteins. It’s specifically designed to block a protein called tumor necrosis factor (TNF). TNF is thought to cause inflammation and damage in various autoimmune conditions.

Do doctors prescribe Cimzia for ulcerative colitis?

No. Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, Cimzia isn’t approved to treat UC.

Instead, among other uses, Cimzia is used to treat a type of IBD called Crohn’s disease. While UC and Crohn’s disease are both types of IBD, doctors treat these conditions differently.

If you have questions about treatment options for UC, talk with your doctor.

Cimzia: Alternatives

Doctors may prescribe drugs other than Cimzia for your condition. Certain drugs may work better for you than others.

Cimzia is used to treat several conditions. Here are summaries of other drugs that doctors sometimes prescribe for the following conditions:

For more information about alternatives to Cimzia, ask your doctor. They can tell you about other medications they could prescribe for your condition. Read below to learn about specific alternatives to Cimzia.

Cimzia vs. Humira and other drugs

To learn more about some alternatives to Cimzia, view the following articles:

Cimzia: Using while pregnant

Doctors aren’t sure whether it’s safe to take Cimzia during pregnancy. There haven’t been enough clinical studies of the drug in human pregnancy.

Animal studies haven’t shown harmful effects when pregnant animals were given the drug. However, animal studies don’t always accurately predict what would happen in humans.

If you’re pregnant or planning a pregnancy, talk with your doctor before using Cimzia. They can advise on treatment options during this time.

Cimzia’s pregnancy registry

If you use Cimzia during pregnancy, your doctor may recommend enrolling in the drug’s pregnancy registry. Pregnancy registries gather information about the safety of a medication’s use during pregnancy. To learn more, call 877-311-8972 or visit the registry’s website. Your doctor can also discuss the registry with you.

Cimzia and birth control needs

Doctors aren’t sure whether it’s safe to take Cimzia during pregnancy. Talk with your doctor about your birth control needs with Cimzia if you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant.

Your doctor can recommend whether you should use birth control with this medication. They can also advise you on the type of birth control that’s right for you.

Cimzia: Using while breastfeeding

Doctors aren’t sure whether it’s safe to take Cimzia while breastfeeding. No harmful effects were seen in two small clinical studies of children breastfed by people taking the drug.

If you’re breastfeeding or considering it, talk with your doctor. They can help you decide how to feed your child while you’re being treated for your condition.

Cimzia: How it works

Cimzia is approved to treat the following conditions in adults:

These are considered autoimmune conditions. This means your body’s immune system causes them. With these conditions, the immune system produces inflammation, which may cause swelling in the affected body tissues. This leads to symptoms, such as pain.

A protein called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is thought to contribute to this inflammation.

Cimzia contains the active drug certolizumab pegol. Its mechanism of action (how it works) is to block TNF. By blocking TNF, Cimzia helps to reduce inflammation in the body. This is meant to ease the symptoms of the above conditions.

How long does Cimzia take to start working?

Cimzia starts working right after your first dose. However, it may take a few weeks to see an improvement in your symptoms.

Talk with your doctor if you have questions about what to expect with Cimzia treatment.

Cimzia: How to use

Your doctor will recommend how you should inject Cimzia. It’s important that you take doses of the drug exactly as your doctor instructs.

Cimzia is a medication that’s given by subcutaneous injection.

Cimzia comes in a vial or a syringe. After your healthcare professional shows you, you may be able to use Cimzia syringes to give yourself injections at home. Or, the drug may be given by a healthcare professional at a doctor’s office or clinic.

Keep in mind that you may need to receive two injections of Cimzia for each dose. For example, if your dose is 400 mg, you will receive two injections of 200 mg each.

Cimzia injection sites

Cimzia can be injected into the following areas of the body:

  • thigh
  • abdomen (at least 2 inches away from the bellybutton)

Be sure to inject the drug at least an inch away from the injection site you used last time. Avoid injecting areas where your skin is bruised, sore, hard, discolored, scarred, or has stretch marks.

For more information about how to inject Cimzia, talk with your doctor or check out the drug’s prescribing information. You can also view instructions from the drug’s manufacturer on how to inject Cimzia doses at home by clicking here.

Questions about using Cimzia

Here’s a list of common questions related to taking doses of Cimzia.

  • When should I take Cimzia? Take Cimzia according to the dosing schedule your doctor prescribes. View these medication reminder options to help avoid missing doses of Cimzia. You could also set an alarm, use a timer, or download a reminder app on your phone.
  • Do I need to take Cimzia with food? Cimzia is a medication that you (or a healthcare professional) will inject. It doesn’t matter if you eat before or after a Cimzia injection.
  • Is there a best time of day to take Cimzia? There isn’t a best time of day to take Cimzia. Take it according to the dosing schedule your doctor prescribes.

Cimzia: Consuming alcohol during treatment

There are no known interactions between Cimzia and alcohol. If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about whether there’s an amount that’s safe to consume during Cimzia treatment.

Cimzia: Interactions

Cimzia may interact with other medications.

No specific herbs, supplements, or foods are known to interact with Cimzia.

Different interactions can cause different effects. Some interactions can interfere with a drug’s effectiveness. Others can increase a drug’s side effects or cause them to be severe.

If any of the interactions listed below might pertain to you, talk with your doctor. They can tell you what you need to do to avoid the interaction.

  • Cimzia and anakinra, abatacept, rituximab, or natalizumab. The manufacturer of Cimzia advises that these drugs should not be taken together. This is because of an increased risk of serious infection. Your doctor will likely not prescribe any of these drugs together with Cimzia:
  • Cimzia and other medications. The risk of side effects of Cimzia may be higher when it’s used with certain other medications. You and your doctor will decide whether you’ll take the following types of drugs during Cimzia treatment:
    • corticosteroids, such as prednisone or methylprednisolone (Medrol)
    • methotrexate (Trexall)
  • Cimzia and herbs and supplements. Cimzia isn’t known to interact with any herbs or supplements.
  • Cimzia and foods. There aren’t any interactions known between Cimzia and foods.
  • Cimzia and lab tests. In some cases, medications can affect the results of certain lab tests. This is possible with Cimzia and the following test:
    • activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), a test used to measure blood clotting
  • Cimzia and certain vaccines. It’s recommended that you don’t receive live or live-attenuated vaccines while taking Cimzia. (These vaccines contain live forms of the germs they’re meant to protect you from.) Examples of vaccines that should be avoided with Cimzia include:
    • influenza vaccine that’s given as a nasal spray (FluMist)
    • rotavirus vaccine
    • measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine
    • chickenpox (varicella) vaccine

For information about drug-condition interactions, see the “Cimzia: Precautions” section below.

Cimzia: Precautions

This drug comes with several precautions.

FDA warnings

This drug has boxed warnings, the most serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Boxed warnings alert doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Risk of serious infection. In rare cases, Cimzia may increase your risk of serious infections from bacteria, viruses, or fungi. The drug may also reactivate infections you’ve had in the past. Examples of serious infections include tuberculosis (TB) and pneumonia. If you develop a serious infection, you may need hospital care. In rare cases, these infections may be fatal.

Your doctor will likely test you for TB before starting Cimzia treatment and periodically while you’re taking the drug. If they find you have TB before starting Cimzia, your doctor will treat the TB before they start treating you with the medication.

If you develop a serious infection while taking Cimzia, your doctor may have you stop the drug until your infection has been treated.

Risk of cancer. Cimzia belongs to a group of drugs called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. Cancer, such as lymphoma, has been reported in people ages 18 years or younger who took a TNF blocker. These cases were rarely fatal. However, because of this risk, Cimzia is not approved for use in children.

Other precautions

Tell your doctor about your health history before starting treatment with Cimzia. Your doctor may not recommend this medication if you have certain factors affecting your health or specific medical conditions. These situations are known as drug-condition interactions.

These factors and conditions include those listed below.

  • Heart failure. Congestive heart failure (CHF) has been reported in people who took Cimzia. If you already have CHF, taking this drug could make your condition worse. If you have CHF, your doctor will recommend whether Cimzia is safe for you. However, your doctor will likely monitor you closely if they decide it is safe for you to take the drug.
  • Nervous system conditions, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Nervous system problems have been reported in people who took Cimzia. If you already have a problem that affects your brain or nerves, such as MS or seizures, talk with your doctor. They can recommend if it’s safe for you to use Cimzia.
  • Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers, including Cimzia, may cause HBV reactivation (a flare-up of the virus if it’s already in your body). With reactivation, the virus begins causing hepatitis B symptoms again. In rare cases, HBV reactivation can be fatal. Your doctor will test you for hepatitis B before you begin treatment with Cimzia.  If you test positive, they’ll want to treat the hepatitis B before you start receiving Cimzia. And while you’re using Cimzia, they’ll monitor you closely for any signs of HBV reactivation.
  • Blood disorders. Cimzia can cause blood disorders, such as aplastic anemia. Blood disorders can affect your body’s ability to fight infection or stop bleeds when they occur. If you have an existing blood disorder, using Cimzia may worsen your condition. Talk with your doctor to find out more about if it’s safe for you to take Cimzia.
  • Allergic reaction, including latex. Your doctor will likely not prescribe Cimzia if you’ve had an allergic reaction to it or any of its ingredients. Also, note that Cimzia vials and syringes have parts made from natural rubber latex. Some people may be allergic to this material. To find out about other treatment options, talk with your doctor.
  • Pregnancy. If you’d like additional information about taking Cimzia while pregnant, view the “Cimzia: Using while pregnant” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. If you’d like more information about taking Cimzia while breastfeeding, view the “Cimzia: Using while breastfeeding” section above.

To learn more about side effects of Cimzia that could be harmful, see the “Cimzia: Side effects” section above.

Cimzia: Overdose

For some drugs, taking more than the recommended dosage may lead to unwanted side effects or overdose. Do not use more Cimzia than your doctor advises.

What to do if you take too much Cimzia

Call your doctor if you think you’ve taken too much of this drug. Also, you can call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. However, if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number. Or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

Cimzia: Expiration, storage, and disposal

Here’s some information about Cimzia’s expiration date, as well as how to store and dispose of the drug.

  • Expiration. Your pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on Cimzia’s packaging. This date is usually 1 year from the date the medication was dispensed to you. Expiration dates help ensure that a medication is effective during a period of time. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advises that you avoid using expired drugs. If you have an unused medication and it’s past the drug’s expiration date, talk with your pharmacist. They can let you know whether you might still be able to use the medication.
  • Storage. Many factors determine how long a medication remains good to use. These factors include how and where you store the drug. Cimzia syringes may be stored in the refrigerator at 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C). Alternatively, Cimzia syringes may be stored at room temperature (up to 77°F or 25°C) for up to 7 days. Do not refrigerate the syringes after they’ve been stored at room temperature. And do not freeze Cimzia. The medication should be kept away from light in a tightly sealed container.
  • Disposal. Dispose of any used syringes, needles, or autoinjectors right after using them. You can safely dispose of these items in an FDA-approved sharps container. Doing so helps prevent others, including children and pets, from accidentally taking the drug. It also helps them avoid harm from needles. If you’d like to buy a sharps container, you can find options online. Or ask your doctor, pharmacist, or health insurance company where you can purchase one. Your pharmacist can give you more information about disposing of Cimzia. Also, check out this page for several tips on safe medication disposal.

Cimzia: Questions for your doctor

If you have questions about Cimzia, talk with your doctor. They can help advise you on whether Cimzia could be a good treatment option for you.

Here’s a list of questions you may want to ask your doctor:

  • Will I give myself Cimzia injections, or will I receive them at your office?
  • Should I continue taking my other medications?
  • How can I reduce my risk of Cimzia’s serious side effects?

Your doctor may tell you about other treatment options for your condition. And you may find these articles helpful in learning about alternative drugs for:

Also, view our selection of videos on these conditions:

Disclaimer: Healthgrades has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.

Medical Reviewer: Alex Brewer, PharmD, MBA
Last Review Date: 2022 Jun 8
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.