Aldactone (spironolactone)

Medically Reviewed By Dena Westphalen, Pharm.D.

About Aldactone

Aldactone is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat the following conditions in adults:

Aldactone is approved to treat these conditions in certain situations. For details about these conditions and how the drug treats them, see the “Aldactone: Uses” section below.

Key points

The following table provides key facts about Aldactone.

Active drug spironolactone
Drug classification aldosterone antagonist, which is also known as a potassium-sparing diuretic
Form oral tablet

Finding a healthcare professional

If you’re interested in taking this drug, search here to find a doctor who might prescribe it.

Aldactone: Generic

Aldactone is a brand-name medication. It contains the active drug spironolactone, which is also available in a generic form. A generic is an identical copy of the active drug found in a brand-name medication.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ensures that generic drugs are as safe and effective as their original drug. Generics tend to be less expensive than brand-name drugs.

If you’d like to know about the generic version of Aldactone, ask your doctor or pharmacist. They can tell you if the generic medication comes in forms and strengths recommended for your condition.

Aldactone: Side effects

As with most drugs, it’s possible to have side effects with Aldactone. These can include some mild side effects but also some serious ones.

To learn more about Aldactone’s side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They may also provide information about managing certain side effects of this drug.

Keep in mind that Aldactone was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1960. At that time, the process for approving medications was different than it is today. Details about the side effects of Aldactone weren’t collected until after the drug became available as a prescription. For this reason, it isn’t known for certain whether the side effects below occurred in Aldactone’s clinical studies.

Note: The FDA tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Aldactone, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild and serious side effects

Mild and serious side effects of Aldactone are listed below. This article does not include all of Aldactone’s possible side effects.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Aldactone may include:

Most times, mild side effects of a drug go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if any side effects become severe or don’t go away.

* This is not a complete list of Aldactone’s mild side effects. To learn about other mild side effects of this drug, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Or you can view the drug’s prescribing information.
† To learn more about allergic reaction, see below. An allergic reaction is possible after taking Aldactone. However, it’s not clear whether this side effect occurred in clinical studies.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects of Aldactone may include:

Serious side effects from Aldactone aren’t common, but they are possible. If you have serious side effects, call your doctor right away. However, if you’re having a medical emergency or your symptoms feel life threatening, call 911 or a local emergency number.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. In this article, use of the term “male” refers to sex assigned at birth.
† To learn more about allergic reaction, see below. An allergic reaction is possible after taking Aldactone. However, it’s not clear whether this side effect occurred in clinical studies.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Aldactone. A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible.

Possible symptoms of mild and serious allergic reactions are listed in the table below.

Mild allergic reaction symptoms Serious allergic reaction symptoms
flushing swelling under your skin, possibly in your hands, feet, lips, or eyelids
rash swelling in your throat or mouth
itching trouble breathing

If you have an allergic reaction to Aldactone, call your doctor right away. This is important because the reaction could become severe.

However, if you’re having a medical emergency or your symptoms feel life threatening, call 911 or a local emergency number.

Aldactone: Questions you may have

Here are some common questions about Aldactone and brief answers to them. If you’d like to know more about these topics, ask your doctor.

Note: Sex and gender exist on spectrums. In this article, use of the terms “female” and “male” refers to sex assigned at birth.

Do doctors prescribe Aldactone for acne?

Yes, in some cases, doctors prescribe Aldactone to treat acne.

However, Aldactone isn’t approved to treat acne. Doctors may prescribe the drug off-label for this condition. With off-label use, doctors prescribe a drug for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

In fact, spironolactone is recommended as a treatment option in the American Academy of Dermatology guidelines for acne. (Spironolactone is the active drug in Aldactone.) Specifically, the drug is recommended for use in females with acne. The guidelines do not recommend this drug for use in males with acne due to its risk of side effects.

If you’re interested in using Aldactone for acne, talk with your doctor. They can recommend the right treatment option for your condition.

Is Aldactone used to treat hair loss?

Possibly.

Aldactone isn’t approved to treat hair loss. However, doctors may prescribe the drug off-label for a certain type of hair loss. With off-label use, doctors prescribe a drug for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

Specifically, Aldactone may be used to treat a type of female hair loss called androgenetic alopecia. This condition is also known as female pattern baldness. A review of studies found spironolactone to be safe and effective for this purpose. (Spironolactone is the active drug in Aldactone.)

Keep in mind that hair loss has also been reported as a side effect of Aldactone. However, it isn’t known how common this side effect was in the drug’s clinical studies.

If you’re interested in using Aldactone for hair loss, talk with your doctor. They can advise you on treatment options for your condition.

Can Aldactone be given for PCOS or hirsutism treatment?

Aldactone may be given for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or hirsutism. However, the drug isn’t approved for these uses. Doctors may prescribe Aldactone off-label for PCOS or hirsutism. With off-label use, doctors prescribe a drug for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

PCOS is a hormonal disorder that occurs in females. It’s typically caused by cysts on the ovaries. PCOS may cause abnormal menstrual cycles, obesity, and acne.

PCOS may also cause hirsutism. With hirsutism, females have excessive growth of coarse hairs on the face or other areas of the body where hair wouldn’t typically grow. In addition to PCOS, hirsutism may be caused by other factors such as medications, including cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune, Gengraf) and certain tumors.

If you’re interested in using Aldactone for PCOS or hirsutism, talk with your doctor. They can recommend the right treatment for your condition.

Aldactone: Dosage

Below, you’ll find dosages that are commonly recommended for Aldactone. However, you should take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. They’ll recommend the dosage that’s best for your needs.

Most often, doctors start by prescribing a low dosage of Aldactone. Then, they’ll change the dosage over time to an amount that’s right for the condition being treated. Doctors typically prescribe the smallest dosage that gives the desired outcome.

The dosage of Aldactone that your doctor prescribes will depend on factors such as:

  • any health conditions you have
  • the condition you’re using Aldactone to treat and the severity of the condition
  • other medications you take
  • side effects you may have

Aldactone’s form

Aldactone comes as an oral tablet that you swallow.

Aldactone’s strengths: 25 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg

Aldactone is available in the following strengths:

  • 25 milligrams (mg)
  • 50 mg
  • 100 mg

Aldactone’s recommended dosages

Aldactone is approved to treat the conditions below in adults, when used in certain situations:

Recommended dosages for Aldactone are described below. Dosages depend on the condition being treated. For example, the dosage for high blood pressure may be different from the dosage for fluid retention and swelling.

Use Dosage
high blood pressure 25 mg to 100 mg once per day, or as divided doses taken more than once per day
HFrEF 25 mg to 50 mg once per day
fluid retention and swelling* 25 mg to 200 mg once per day, or as divided doses taken more than once per day
primary hyperaldosteronism, for short-term use before surgery 100 mg to 400 mg per day, taken as directed by your doctor
primary hyperaldosteronism, for long-term use without surgery talk with your doctor

* If you have fluid retention and swelling related to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver), your doctor may give your first doses of Aldactone in the hospital.

Your doctor may prescribe a different dosage of Aldactone based on several factors. These include your blood potassium level or whether you have kidney or liver problems. If you have questions about your Aldactone dosage, talk with your doctor.

Dosage considerations

Below are some things to consider about Aldactone’s dosage.

  • Missing a dose. If you miss a dose of Aldactone, take it as soon as you remember and then continue your usual dosage schedule. However, if it’s almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the usual time. Do not take two doses to make up for a missed dose. Doing so can increase your risk of side effects with Aldactone. Try these medication reminder options to help avoid missing doses. You could also set an alarm, use a timer, or download a reminder app on your phone.
  • Length of treatment. Doctors typically prescribe Aldactone as a long-term treatment for high blood pressure, HFrEF, and fluid retention and swelling. In certain situations, the drug may be taken long term to treat primary hyperaldosteronism. You’ll likely take it long term for these uses if you and your doctor feel it’s safe and effective for your condition. However, Aldactone is usually prescribed short term when used to manage symptoms of primary hyperaldosteronism before surgery for this condition.

Aldactone: Uses

Prescription drugs, such as Aldactone, are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat certain conditions. Doctors sometimes prescribe drugs off-label for other conditions. With off-label use, doctors prescribe a drug for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

Using Aldactone for lowering blood pressure

The FDA has approved Aldactone to treat high blood pressure in adults.

With high blood pressure, the force of blood pushing against the walls of your arteries is too high. According to the American Heart Association, normal blood pressure is less than 120/80 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). Blood pressure is considered high if it’s consistently 130/80 mm Hg or greater.

Most people with high blood pressure don’t have symptoms of the condition. However, possible symptoms of high blood pressure may include:

  • shortness of breath
  • headache
  • nosebleeds
  • chest pain
  • flushing

Doctors prescribe Aldactone in combination with other blood pressure medications. It’s used for this purpose when other drugs haven’t been effective for lowering blood pressure. 

Using Aldactone for heart failure

The FDA has approved Aldactone to treat a certain type of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). This condition is also known as systolic heart failure.

With HFrEF, the left ventricle (lower left chamber) of the heart is not strong enough to pump blood to the rest of the body. Specifically, having HFrEF means your heart pumps out less than 40% of the blood that flows through your left ventricle.

Symptoms of HFrEF include:

  • fatigue
  • shortness of breath
  • cough
  • edema (fluid retention and swelling)
  • increased heart rate

Doctors prescribe Aldactone to treat New York Heart Association (NYHA)* Class III or Class IV HFrEF. With these types of HFrEF, your symptoms are severe enough to limit your daily activity and may even occur while you’re resting.

For this purpose, Aldactone is prescribed in combination with other heart failure medications. (For examples of these medications, see the “Using Aldactone with other drugs” section below.) The drug is used to:

  • treat edema
  • increase the amount of time a person survives with HFrEF
  • reduce the risk of staying in a hospital due to HfrEF

* Doctors use the NYHA scale to rank the severity of a person’s heart failure symptoms.

Using Aldactone for fluid retention and swelling

The FDA has approved Aldactone to treat fluid retention and swelling in certain adults. This condition is also known as edema.

Specifically, doctors prescribe Aldactone to treat edema in adults with either:

  • cirrhosis (scarring of the liver), when the edema does not improve after reducing the amount of fluids and salt you consume
  • nephrotic syndrome (a group of conditions that indicate kidney damage), when the edema does not improve after the following:
    • treating nephrotic syndrome itself
    • reducing the amount of fluids and salt you consume
    • using other diuretics (water pills)

With edema, you may have fluid retention and swelling in your arms, hands, legs, or feet. Other symptoms of edema include:

  • skin that’s stretched, shiny, or discolored
  • skin that dimples after you press down on the affected area
  • abdomen that’s bloated or has increased in size

Using Aldactone for primary hyperaldosteronism

The FDA has approved Aldactone to treat primary hyperaldosteronism in certain adults. This condition is also known as Conn’s syndrome.

Specifically, doctors prescribe Aldactone for primary hyperaldosteronism in the following situations:

  • as a short-term treatment before surgery for this condition
  • as long-term treatment in people with:
    • a certain noncancerous tumor on the adrenal glands, when surgery to treat this condition isn’t possible
    • certain lumps on the adrenal glands that cause the glands to produce more hormones than usual

With primary hyperaldosteronism, your body produces too much of a hormone called aldosterone. Having too much aldosterone can lead to problems such as high blood pressure, fluid retention and swelling, and a low blood level of potassium.

Symptoms of this condition include:

  • fatigue
  • excessive thirst
  • muscle spasms, cramps, or twitches
  • headache

Using Aldactone with other drugs

Doctors may prescribe Aldactone with certain other drugs.

For high blood pressure, doctors prescribe Aldactone in combination with other blood pressure medications. Examples include:

For heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HfrEF), doctors prescribe Aldactone with other heart failure medications. Examples include:

  • ARBs, such as valsartan (Diovan) and losartan (Cozaar)
  • ACE inhibitors, such as lisinopril (Zestril) and quinapril (Accupril)
  • vasodilators, such as hydralazine and isosorbide dinitrate (Isordil)

For conditions other than high blood pressure and HfrEF, your doctor will advise whether to take Aldactone on its own or with other treatments.

Using Aldactone in children

Doctors typically won’t prescribe Aldactone for children. The drug is approved only for use in adults.

Finding a healthcare professional for Aldactone

If you’re interested in taking Aldactone, you can search here to find a doctor or healthcare professional who might prescribe it. You can prepare for your appointment by viewing Healthgrades’ appointment guide for high blood pressure or heart failure.

Aldactone: How it works

Aldactone is used to treat the conditions below in certain adults:

To learn more about these conditions, see the “Aldactone: Uses” section above.

Aldactone belongs to a class of drugs called aldosterone antagonists, which are also known as potassium-sparing diuretics. Aldactone’s mechanism of action (how it works) is by blocking the action of a hormone called aldosterone.

Aldosterone has several functions in your body. It helps regulate blood pressure and tells your kidneys how much water, potassium, and sodium to filter out of your blood and into your urine.

By blocking the action of aldosterone, Aldactone helps your kidneys get rid of more water and sodium in your urine. It also helps your kidneys keep potassium in your blood. By doing this, Aldactone helps treat the conditions above.

How long does Aldactone take to start working?

Aldactone starts working within a few hours after taking your first dose. However, it may take several weeks to notice the symptoms of your condition ease.

Talk with your doctor or pharmacist about what to expect with Aldactone treatment.

Aldactone: Consuming alcohol during treatment

Aldactone and alcohol don’t have any known interactions.

However, drinking alcohol while taking Aldactone may worsen certain side effects of the drug. Examples include:

  • drowsiness
  • dizziness
  • headache
  • digestive side effects, such as diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting
  • dehydration

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor. They can recommend an amount that’s safe to consume while you’re taking Aldactone.

Aldactone: Interactions

Aldactone may interact with other medications and certain supplements.

Different interactions can cause different effects. Some interactions can interfere with a drug’s effectiveness. Others can increase a drug’s side effects or cause them to be severe.

Before you start Aldactone, be sure to tell your doctor about any medications, herbs, vitamins, or supplements you take. They can check for any possible interactions between these products and Aldactone.

If any of the interactions listed below might pertain to you, talk with your doctor. They can tell you what you need to do to avoid the interaction.

  • Aldactone and eplerenone (Inspra). The manufacturer of Aldactone advises that these drugs should not be taken together. Eplerenone is an aldosterone antagonist, which is the same class of drugs Aldactone belongs to. Be sure to discuss this with your doctor if these drugs have been prescribed together for you.
  • Aldactone and potassium. Because Aldactone may cause a high blood level of potassium, your doctor may recommend that you do not take it with drugs that increase blood potassium levels. If you do take Aldactone with these medications, your doctor may closely watch your potassium levels. Examples of these drugs include:
  • Aldactone and other medications. Because Aldactone may interact with certain drugs, your doctor may recommend you do not take it with them. Examples include:
  • Aldactone and herbs and supplements. Certain herbs and supplements may interact with Aldactone. An example is potassium supplements.
  • Aldactone and foods. Certain medications interact with foods. An example of foods that may affect Aldactone includes salt substitutes that contain potassium.

For information about drug-condition interactions, see the “Aldactone: Precautions” section below.

Aldactone: Precautions

Tell your doctor about your health history before starting treatment with Aldactone. Your doctor may not recommend this medication if you have certain factors affecting your health or specific medical conditions. These situations are considered drug-condition interactions.

Contraindications for Aldactone

Certain factors or conditions that you have now or had before may prevent your doctor from prescribing Aldactone. This is due to the risk of harm.

These factors and conditions, which are known as contraindications, include those listed below.

High blood level of potassium. Aldactone is contraindicated for use in people who have a high blood level of potassium. This is because Aldactone can increase the level of potassium in your blood, which could make your blood potassium level even higher. If you have a high blood level of potassium, your doctor can recommend treatment options other than Aldactone.

Addison’s disease. Aldactone is contraindicated for use in people who have Addison’s disease. With Addison’s disease, your body doesn’t produce enough of certain hormones. This includes a hormone called aldosterone. Aldactone blocks the action of aldosterone in the body, which could worsen Addison’s disease. If you have this condition, your doctor can recommend treatment options other than Aldactone.

Other factors and conditions

These factors and conditions include those listed below.

Kidney problems. Before taking Aldactone, be sure to tell your doctor if you have kidney problems such as kidney failure. Kidney problems can cause a high level of potassium in your blood. Aldactone can also increase the level of potassium in your blood. Due to this risk, your doctor may closely watch your potassium levels if you have kidney problems and take Aldactone.

Allergic reaction. Your doctor will likely not prescribe Aldactone if you’ve had an allergic reaction to it or any of its ingredients. To find out about other treatment options, talk with your doctor.

Pregnancy. If you’d like additional information about taking Aldactone while pregnant, view the “Aldactone: Taking while pregnant” section below.

Breastfeeding. If you’d like additional information about taking Aldactone while breastfeeding, view the “Aldactone: Taking while breastfeeding” section below.

To learn more about effects of Aldactone that could be harmful, see the “Aldactone: Side effects” section above.

Aldactone: Cost

As with other medications, prices for Aldactone may vary. The drug’s price will depend on factors such as:

Cost considerations for Aldactone

Here are some things to consider when looking into the cost of Aldactone.

Option for a 90-day supply. For some drugs, it’s possible to get a 90-day supply. If this option is approved by your insurance company, it can help lower the cost of the drug. It can also help you avoid frequent trips to your pharmacy. If you’d like to learn more about this option, ask your doctor, pharmacist, or insurance company.

Need for prior authorization. Before insurance coverage for Aldactone is approved, your insurance company may require prior authorization. In this case, your doctor and insurance company will communicate about your prescription for Aldactone. Then, the insurance company will decide if the drug will be covered. To find out if you need prior authorization for Aldactone, contact your insurance company.

Possible cost assistance options. Financial assistance to help lower the cost of Aldactone is available. The Pfizer RxPathways program for Aldactone may help reduce its cost. To learn more and see if you’re eligible for support, call 866-706-2400 or visit the manufacturer’s website. Also, check out this article to learn about ways to save on prescription drugs.

Use of a mail-order pharmacy. Aldactone may be dispensed through mail-order pharmacies. Getting your prescription through a mail-order pharmacy could lower its cost. It can also allow you to get the drug without leaving home. To find out more about this option, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or insurance company.

Availability of a generic form. Aldactone comes in a generic form called spironolactone. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics are typically less expensive than brand-name drugs. If your doctor prescribes Aldactone, but you want to know about taking spironolactone, talk with them about which option might be better for you. Also, check your insurance plan because it might cover just one form or the other.

Aldactone: Alternatives

Doctors may prescribe drugs other than Aldactone for your condition. Certain drugs may work better for you than others.

Aldactone is used to treat high blood pressure, heart failure, and other conditions. Here are summaries of other drugs that doctors sometimes prescribe for heart failure and high blood pressure.

For additional information about alternatives to Aldactone, ask your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that could be prescribed for your condition.

Aldactone: How to take

Your doctor will recommend how you should take Aldactone. It’s important to take the drug exactly as your doctor instructs.

Aldactone comes as an oral tablet. You’ll take the drug by swallowing it.

Questions about taking Aldactone

Here’s a list of common questions related to taking Aldactone.

  • When should I take Aldactone? You may take Aldactone once per day, or as divided doses taken more than once per day. Your doctor will tell you exactly when to take the drug. Try these medication reminder options to help avoid missing doses of Aldactone. You could also set an alarm, use a timer, or download a reminder app on your phone.
  • Do I need to take Aldactone with food? You can take Aldactone with or without food. However, try to take it the same way for every dose. For example, if you start by taking Aldactone with food, you’ll continue taking every dose with food. If you start by taking Aldactone without food, you’ll take every dose without food.
  • Can Aldactone be chewed, split, or crushed? The manufacturer of Aldactone doesn’t state whether the tablets can be chewed, split, or crushed. If you have trouble swallowing Aldactone tablets, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.
  • Is there a best time of day to take Aldactone? No, there isn’t a best time of day to take it. You can take Aldactone any time of day.

Aldactone: Taking while pregnant

It’s not known whether Aldactone is safe to take during pregnancy. However, the way Aldactone works in the body could cause harm to a fetus if the drug is taken during pregnancy.

In addition, animal studies have shown hormone problems in fetuses of animals given the drug during pregnancy. Keep in mind that animal studies will not always predict what happens with humans.

Due to these risks, doctors typically will not prescribe Aldactone during pregnancy.

If you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk with your doctor. They can recommend treatments other than Aldactone for your condition.

Aldactone and birth control needs

Doctors aren’t sure whether it’s safe to take Aldactone during pregnancy. Talk with your doctor about your birth control needs with Aldactone if you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant. Your doctor can recommend if you should use birth control with this medication.

Aldactone: Taking while breastfeeding

It’s not known whether Aldactone is safe to take while breastfeeding.

A small amount of Aldactone passes into breast milk. However, no side effects have been reported in children breastfed by a person who took the drug.

If you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed while taking Aldactone, talk with your doctor. They can advise whether it’s safe for you to take the drug during this time.

Aldactone: Overdose

Serious effects can occur if you take more than the recommended dosage of Aldactone. Do not use more Aldactone than your doctor recommends.  

Symptoms of overdose

Symptoms that an overdose could cause include:

What to do in case of overdose

Call your doctor if you think you’ve taken too much of this drug. Also, you can call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use its online tool. However, if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or a local emergency number. Or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

Aldactone: Expiration, storage, and disposal

Here’s some information about Aldactone’s expiration date, as well as how to store and dispose of the drug.

Expiration. Your pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on Aldactone’s bottle. This date is usually 1 year from the date the medication was dispensed to you. Expiration dates help ensure that a medication is effective during a period of time.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advises that you avoid taking expired drugs. If you have an unused medication and it’s past the drug’s expiration date, talk with your pharmacist. They can let you know whether you might still be able to use the medication.

Storage. Many factors determine how long a medication remains good to use. These factors include how and where you store the drug. Store Aldactone tablets at room temperature below 77°F (25°C). Avoid storing it in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms. The medication should be kept in a tightly sealed container.

Disposal. It’s important to safely dispose of Aldactone if you no longer need to take it and have unused medication. Doing so helps prevent others, including children and pets, from accidentally taking the drug. It also helps avoid causing harm to the environment.

Ask your pharmacist for information about disposing of Aldactone. Also, check out this page for several tips on safe medication disposal.

Aldactone: Questions for your doctor

If you have questions about Aldactone, talk with your doctor. They can help advise you on whether Aldactone could be a good treatment option for you.

Here’s a list of questions you may want to ask your doctor:

  • Can you recommend a salt substitute that’s safe to use while taking Aldactone?
  • Will Aldactone cure my condition?
  • What should I know about stopping Aldactone?

Your doctor may also tell you about other treatment options for your condition. You may find these articles on heart failure and high blood pressure helpful in learning about alternative drugs. And view our selection of videos on heart health.

Disclaimer: Healthgrades has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.

Medical Reviewer: Dena Westphalen, Pharm.D.
Last Review Date: 2022 Sep 28
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.